Monthly Archives: July 2013

Remembering Romania…

Bringing milk to collectionA short 13 months ago, I was in Romania — a fact that was brought powerfully back to me when I opened my July National Geographic and saw a story titled “Hay. Beautiful.” about the incredibly bio-diverse, grass-growing meadows of Transylvania.meadows

Ahhhh, I spent a lot of lovely, fragrant time in those meadows…meadow

…because that’s exactly where Heifer International works: alongside the poor, hard-working, rural Romanians…shepherd3

..who generally own less than 6 acres, live on about $5,000 a year, and raise cows and water buffalo that each eat four or more tons of hay every winter. (And yeah, that’s a lot of hay.)farmer hay

Romanian cows and buffalo (and sheep & goats) raised on that transcendent Transylvania hay produce some of the most delicious, rich, soft, creamy milk, yogurt and cheeses imaginable…Cottage cheese

…but since communism fell in 1989, Romanian farmers have lacked the volume, organization and distribution to sell their dairy products on any viable scale. Dorica & goat

Yet as other economies of Europe stagger to regain their footing, more Romanians are returning home from jobs abroad to work their own hay fields, raise cows, and produce milk. Milk me

Heifer is there to help make that endeavor economically profitable with EU-approved milk collection centers, new storage and cooling equipment, and distribution channels that will hopefully save the meadows…meadow

hay stack

what a meadowsave the cows…Calf 3860

…and save the farms.hay stacksAnd personally, I think that’s a mission well worth supporting.In her garden..

Romania is romantic, lush, gloriously fertile… landscape

…and filled with people whose traditions and agricultural knowledge stretch back to medieval times. wise woman

Sarica-big sheep coat for shepherds

Lucretia It’s a country totally worth seeing – and worth saving for the next generation!Bunaziwa girl from Belin

Categories: Agriculture, Heifer International, Photography, Romania, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 20 Comments

Cameroon, the Remix.

4 girls from Mordok, coming in from the fields.

5 girls from Mordok, coming in from the fields.

Cameroon was easily one of the most fascinating, diverse, disturbing and memorable countries I visited in 2012 with Heifer International…and that’s really saying something.red scarf

My visit started with a minor disaster – we missed our flight from the capital city of Yaoundé up north to Maroua, and there wasn’t another one for 3 days. But as so often happens (if only I had the equanimity to keep this in mind), that accident ended up fortuitously taking me on the road to Douala, where we were able to see 3 other projects that were totally unique to Cameroon: one with snails…

Tangue Jokelt Dieudonne, proud member of Heifer's  Melong GIC with his snails

Tangue Jokelt Dieudonne, proud member of Heifer’s Melong GIC with his snails.

one with pigs …

Cute pigs from the CIG Women's project in Douala

… and one project with cane rats, a rodent I fear with hysterical fervor.

(and don't say that he's more afraid of me than I am of him)

(and don’t try to say that he’s more afraid of me than I am of him)

The south of Cameroon, like Douala, is wet, fertile and steamy….

Banana country!

Banana country!

…unlike the sere, flat and unrelentingly dry L’Extreme Nord. Scorched earth, Maroua

In fact, Cameroon is known as “Africa in miniature” because it contains all the continent’s topography: coast, desert, mountains, rainforest and savanna.

The southerners tend to be short, chubby, affable and primarily Christian…President Emilienne Zikou and VP Denise Nannou, GIC Ndoungue

…while the northerners are tall, lean, reserved and often Muslim.muslim girl

And it is the North that I worry deeply about. Water has always been scarce here, but never more so than now, with climate change prolonging the dry season to almost 11 months a year.mother water

The women of Barza, where Heifer dug a  bore hole, still have to walk about 5 miles each way, every day to secure enough water for their households, and even though men now share the task (thanks to Heifer gender equity trainings!) it’s a grueling, maddening waste of time and energy.woman w water

The people of Cameroon, though, are lovely, particularly in the L’Extreme Nord. As I was watching them one day, I wrote this in my book:

“Poverty isn’t pretty. It’s messy, smelly, sweaty. Filthy water hangs in the gutters of the streets. Old, beat-up things are used to the point of extinction and well beyond.boy and toy

Children in tattered cast-off clothing run barefoot through the dust. holding on

But poor people in Africa are also often heart-wrenchingly beautiful. friends

They rise above the destitution of their surroundings, the women sailing like colorful jibs through the channels of a jumbled market… two beauties…splendid and serene.”

Yes, I loved Cameroon. In fact, I love the energy, faith, colors, strength and smiles of Africa as much as any place I’ve ever been. kids

Who wouldn’t?

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To read more about the inspiring Heifer projects I visited in Cameroon (including the rats), click below:

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/01/bienvenue-cameroon/

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/06/poverty-slimed/

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/08/hunger-no-games/

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/11/dead-hen-walking/

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/13/just-add-water/

https://heifer12x12.com/2012/06/15/one-womans-nightmare-is-another-mans-dinner/

Categories: Africa, Agriculture, Animals, Cameroon, Heifer International, Photography, Travel, Water, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

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